Archive for the ‘fashion’ Category

Therapeutic massages via facebook!

Saturday, April 25th, 2009

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Put your online friends in your pocket and … in your jacket! Based on our online communication style with social networks such as facebook and the research on remote physical communication, you can now be anonymously/friends-only massaged. Brainchild of Keywon Chung, Carnaven Chiu, Xiao Xiao, Peggy Pei-Yu Chi and Hiroshi Ishii, Stress OutSourced (SOS) is a peer-to-peer network that allows anonymous users to send each other therapeutic massages to relieve stress. By applying the emerging concept of crowdsourcing to haptic therapy, SOS brings physical and affective dimensions to our already networked lifestyle while preserving the privacy of its members. SOS is an exploration and illustration of a new field of haptic social networking.

Posted by Cati Vaucelle @ Architectradure

[tags] therapy, massage, Keywon Chung, MIT, Media Lab, Tangible Interfaces, TUI, remote communication, Facebook [/tags]

Low cost wearable sensor for detecting Electromagnetic fields

Saturday, September 20th, 2008

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My work “Electromagnetic Field Detector Bracelet” has been accepted as a video. The video will be presented at Ubicomp in Seoul South Korea during the one minute madness Monday 22nd and during the video reception 17:15 - 19:00!

Abstract of the work

We present the design of a cost-effective wearable sensor to detect and indicate the strength and other characteristics of the electric field emanating from a laptop display. Our bracelet can provide an immediate awareness of electric fields radiated from an object used frequently. Our technology thus supports awareness of ambient background emanation beyond human perception. We discuss how detection of such radiation might help to “fingerprint” devices and aid in applications that require determination of indoor location.

Come see me to talk about this work! If you cannot make it, here is the video:

Motivation
Today, many people fear electromagnetic fields. They believe that ambient fields can negatively influence their health. Perhaps, by visualizing the presence of common electromagnetic (EM) fields, users might feel in control of difficult-to-perceive information and transcend their fear, beginning the process of recognizing and moving beyond fear. An analogy might be found in the cheap RF power meters that are sold to enable people to gauge radiation leakage from their microwave ovens. Conversely, providing users with blind data could increase their paranoia when low-level field leakage from common appliances is visualized. Clearly, people need to be educated in how to properly interpret this data. Regardless of one’s belief on the health impact of background EM fields, visualizing the unseen in this way always leads to fascinating and playful exploration. All devices emit background signals (electrostatically, magnetically, acoustically, and optically) that are characteristic of particular devices and also sometimes indicate that device’s mode of operation. Indeed, government contracts mandate that computers and displays used in highly classified work be kept in shielded rooms (SCIFs) to thwart espionage that monitors such background leakage fields.

The “Electromagnetic Field Detector Bracelet” has been accepted as a video for Ubicomp 2008, Seoul South Korea!

Press on Engadget and Make Magazine.

Posted by Cati Vaucelle @ Architectradure

[tags] , bracelet, consumer, culture, DIY, electromagnetic field, EMF, fashion, Media Lab, MIT, mobile, project, technology [/tags]

Graphic design competition -> A new logo for C’N'C Plug Generation!

Wednesday, September 17th, 2008

C’N'C plug generation asked me to spread the word about the C’N'C Plug Generation Contest, a new graphic design competition for talented graphic designers! Interpret in your own way the slogan C’N'C Plug Generation with a photo, a composite, mural, stickers, video clip or sculpture and send it in!

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The best creations will be used as graphics for a series of T-shirts and accessories to be showcased during Milan Fashion Week in February. You’ve got till 30 January 2009 to focus your ideas, create them and send them in! The jury will select three original and unpublished concepts (such as pictures, composites, wall-paintings, stickers, graphics, banner, sculpture) representing in a young and creative way the logo “C’N'C PLUG GENERATION”.

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Prizes
1st - 1000€
2nd - an iPhone
3rd - an iPhone

+ your winning T-shirts and accessories logo will be presented during Milan Fashion Week this February 2009!

Rules
Read the rules ->here<-

Participant must create a concept with any artistic technique, including free-hand drawing and digital art, photography and sculpture. The concept must be sent online to CND in JPG, TIFF, GIF, PDF or PNG format, file of a maximum of 5 MB. The directions on how to upload your creation can be found ->here<-

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Robots need hugs too.

Monday, August 25th, 2008

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Thank you Adrien!

Iced Chest

Monday, August 25th, 2008

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I had designed a system to cool down the body for mental health support. It is always nice to see how such system can be used in another context such as the Nike Lab that designs innovative garments for athletes. One of the product, that I found in the Print edition of Fast Company Magazine, is a jacket that cools down the body. Discovering that performance falls off drastically when core body temperature hits 103 degrees, the Nike lab designed a vest that slows the rise of core body temperature. It is simply filled in with water, then frozen overnight. The vest is meant to be wear an hour prior to competition.

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Screenshot from the Nike designer story

Posted by Cati Vaucelle @ Architectradure

[tags] product design, body, health, sport, culture, fashion, fabric, haptic [/tags]

Ghost of a Victorian christening dress

Sunday, August 3rd, 2008

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This is the photogram of a Victorian christening dress by Adam Fuss. Gelatin silver print photogram. Discovered in ARTnews, is this the ghost of a child or the ghost of a dress? is it instinct of culture that makes us automatically assume that transparency and translucency are properties of the spirit? This work makes us feel as if a spirit had brushed the hem of its garments across a photographic plate.

“Subject and technique conspire to let us participate vicariously in the experience of those early photographic pioneers, high on darkroom chemicals and on the possibilities of their new toy –Francine Prose for ARTnews”

Posted by Cati Vaucelle @ Architectradure

[tags] art, photography, culture, ghost, body, fashion, fabric [/tags]

Organic prosthesis

Monday, June 30th, 2008

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Grow On You by LucyandBart.

LucyandBart is a collaboration between Lucy McRae and Bart Hess described as an instinctual stalking of fashion, architecture, performance and the body. They share a fascination with genetic manipulation and beauty expression. Unconsciously their work touches upon these themes, however it is not their intention to communicate this. They work in a primitive and limitless way creating future human shapes, blindly discovering low – tech prosthetic ways for human enhancement.

Playing with suggestive photography for high impact, they seem obsessed with the body metamorphosis. I call their work organic prosthesis, because they mainly use organic material in their body extension. For instance, they grow seeds on a fabric, which gives the impression of a body grown of grass and soil. The following pictures show the germination from day one to day eight.

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I love their work with foam. The foam transforms the body in a gentle way. Here the artists embrace the prosthetic impulse …

Body and foam

Posted by Cati Vaucelle @ Architectradure

[tags] art, body, culture, clothing, design, fashion, vision, visualization, prosthesis, inspiration [/tags]

Blogging in Motion

Friday, June 13th, 2008

I met Diana Eng at the seamless fashion show in 2006 when my team and I presented Taptap: the scarf that hugs you back! She was showing an impressive inflatable dress, a gown that fits the body to later inflates …

Photos from the rehearsal & Photos from the show that I took during the event.

One of her newest project, Blogging in motion, is a purse which involuntarily blogs your day. Each time the wearer walks 30 steps, the purse takes a photograph and automatically uploads it to a blog online. Time and GPS location for each photo can also be added to the blog. At the end of the day, blog readers can trace back through the wearer’s footsteps by viewing the photographs taken during the day.

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Project by Diana Eng, Emily Albinski, Audrey Roy, Jeannie Yang and Yahoo Research Berkley.

[tags]art, body, clothing, design, fashion, technology, vision, visualization[/tags]

Posted by Cati Vaucelle @ Architectradure

The secrets of syrian seduction

Wednesday, June 4th, 2008

Ayah Bdeir examines the role technology plays in cross cultural communication and attempts to create technologies that promote human rights. One of her latest work “Teta Haniya’s secrets” is one of the most hilarious one -> pics here <-

After decades of running her kinky Syrian lingerie store in the Hamidiya souk of Damascus, Teta Haniya has arrived in America bearing gifts. Drawing on more than 60 years of Islamic teachings on seduction, and updating it using her arsenal of kitschy technology, Teta Haniya hijacks the Western panty, triggering the sexual liberation of American women.

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Posted by Cati Vaucelle @ Architectradure

[tags]art, body, clothing, design, fashion, technology, vision, visualization, culture[/tags]

A chair to peel

Saturday, May 10th, 2008

A chair to peel
The Cabbage Chair, 2008

Nendo designed the cabbage chair for XXIst Century Man exhibition curated by Issey Miyake to commemorate the first anniversary of 21_21 Design Sight in Roppongi, Tokyo.

Miyake asked the designers to make furniture out of the pleated paper that is produced in mass amounts during the process of making pleated fabric, and usually abandoned as an unwanted by-product. The designers’ solution to his challenge transformed a roll of pleated paper into a small chair that appears naturally as you peel away its outside layers, one layer at a time.

Peeling

Resins added during the original paper production process adds strength and the ability to remember forms, and the pleats themselves give the chair elasticity and a springy resilience, for an overall effect that looks almost rough, but gives the user a soft, comfortable seating experience.

Opening
Photo by Masayuki Hayashi

Since the production process is so simple, the designers thought that eventually, the chair could be shipped as one compact roll for the user to cut open and peel back at home. The chair has no internal structure. It is not finished, and it is assembled without nails or screws. This primitive design responds gently to fabrication and distribution costs and environmental concerns, the kinds of issues that face our 21st century selves. Thus, the cabbage chair fits active, optimistic and forward-moving “21st century people”, the kind of people who, to borrow a concept Miyake expressed during a meeting with Nendo, “don’t just wear clothes, but shed their skin”.

Posted by Cati Vaucelle @ Architectradure